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TMI!

Goodness me, but there’s a lot of stuff going on at the moment, both “out there” and with yours truly. Here’s a smattering of the stuff read and played with just today.

Think of it as a good old-fashioned link-fest if you will.

  • If you’re looking to get into Spring, you could do a lot worse than follow the Spring MVC tutorial on the Spring website: despite having been revised over two years ago now, it’s still really very good, and shows the power of this framework for sure
  • If you’re a newbie like me with Spring, and you’re using it with MyEclipse I can help you get over a few minor “gotchas. I may whack a wiki page up soon, once I’ve collected a few more pointers (early days yet)
  • Oh alright then: in the meantime, here’s how to integrate taglib definitions in MyEclipse: Taglib marked as invalid, unknown or no autocomplete—that helped me out with an issue I had today, no end.
  • Tim Tripcony and Chris Whisonant have both joined NTF at Lotus911. Fantastic news for all concerned. Like I said on Nathan’s site: when do you guys open a branch in the UK??
  • Mark Vincenzes has followed up a post he made some ten months ago in the Lotus developerWorks forums about Domino’s HTML conversion capability going forward: What if… we didn’t use <font> tags in our HTML output anymore? Dive in to the discussion!
  • Today I started, in earnest, to catch up on some of the recent Taking Notes podcasts. You really should lbe listening to these, they’re awesome. Bruce and Julian continue to do an amazing job with those. Long may they continue (sixty-one episodes, and counting!)
  • I continue to enjoy FreelanceSwitch. They recently linked to some excellent podcasts being put out there by Craig Ambrose. Well worth a listen (don’t be put off by the mention of Rails: this stuff is good for all of us, Rails or not)

And that is that. For now. :-)

Comments

  1. Ben, are you suggesting that you would come work for us if we had a UK office?

    'Cause personally, I think that's a pretty decent incentive for us to have one. :)Nathan T. Freeman#
  2. Yes I do believe I am, and w00t! as I believe the youngsters say… Nathan, you make me blush ;-) Ben Poole#
  3. @1 I would!Vitor Pereira#
  4. Ben totally off topic but I have a recording of Nathan singing Tenacious D's "Inward Singing" :-). It may just show up on a podcast one day. Nathan - everything has it's price.

    Thanks for the podcast pluggage. We do appreciate it.Bruce Elgort#
  5. @4: awesome… ”The most powerful tool in singing technology since yodeling, dude”Ben Poole#
  6. Oh…. GREEEEEEAT. *sigh*Nathan T. Freeman#
  7. Spring certainly is a great facilitator in java on the server. In my last employer this made producing a Portlet version of a successfull Domino app possible. Else we've ended up in a jungle of self-created complexity again :-)
    Once you've got the basics, the detailed documentation on springframework.com is very usefull.
    There are quite a bunch of articles on developerworks/java about spring. WAS community edition aka Geronimo is a spring app, though personally I haven't used this server yet.
    Unfortunatedly there are currently no english books targeting spring2 (except a meap on manning, which will be finished this summer).
    Spring2 is more compact in its xml, the aop-ish declarative transaction management is easier to set-up and it has more around webservices.
    Combining spring with hibernate has some serious traps (asm-libraries, LazyInitialisationException). I would first take a look at ibatis sqlmaps before going hibernate.
    I see other new technologies like wicket, JSF_with_facelets, EJB3, JBoss SEAM as simplifiers, too. But there are so many…
    Lotus Notes once was seen much more as a application framework for C/C++ developers. Same is finally happening on the JEE side with all the new.
    Axel Janssen#

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